How to Make a Surf Fishing Rig for Whiting

 




What this rig is all about:

Whiting are also called channel mullet and are a cod-like fish most frequently caught in the Florida surf, inlets, harbors, and bays. They are good to eat and can reach up to 2 pounds. So they aren’t the largest fish but are definitely fun to catch and delicious to eat. Check out this double-hook, whiting rig specifically used for surf/beach fishing.

Here is a list of materials/items that you will need to make this rig:

Follow the links for pricing info on Amazon.

15-20 pound fluorocarbon leader line

2 ounce pyramid sinker

2 size 6 Mutu light circle hooks

– scissors/nail clipper

Optional:

1 snap swivel

9 foot + fishing rod for best results

 

How to use this rig:

There’s not much to this rig once you’ve constructed it for surf fishing. You simply cast out the rig with bait on the hooks and wait for a bite. No need to work the bait or even hold onto the rod. Stick a sand spike in the sand and let that hold your rod for you. Good baits to use are sand fleas, shrimp, or even clams. Whiting love to bite on all of these baits.

The 9 foot + rod is not absolutely necessary but will help you cast farther out on the beach. Don’t look for shallow water but instead casting into anywhere from 4-10 feet deep of water is ideal.

When fishing for whiting, it is also advised to use small hooks. The 6/0 Mutu light circle hooks work very well.

 



Setup guide:

  1. The first step to constructing this whiting rig is to cut out about 5 feet length of leader line just to be conservative. The leader won’t be this long after you’re done with the rig because you’ll have to make a couple of dropper loops for the hooks.
  1. Proceed to make 2 dropper loops along the length of the leader line about 1-2 feet apart and about 1 foot from the end of the line like so:

If you don’t know how to make a dropper loop, you can check this video out:

Or if you are lazy and don’t want to tie a dropper loop, you can substitute it with two 3-way swivels.

  1. Now, you can attach the two hooks to the two dropper loops however you like. I prefer tying them directly onto the loop.

I just use this knot to do so:

  1. Step 4 is to then tie the sinker to the end of the line that is approximately 1 foot from the end like so:
  1. The last step is to connect this rig to the main line. You can do this by tying the two lines together or by using a snap snivel for easy removal and modularity for your rod. The finished setup should look something like this:

It’s not the simplest setup to make but it works great! Go out there and test it out! Let me know if this rig is working for you and rate this rig at the top of this article. Also, check out another variation of a whiting rig here.

 

Don’t forget to check out the Pro Fishing Rigs store for more cool stuff!

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